our people.

Jimmy Brunner, LEED AP
partner, co-founder
M.ArchII, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY
B.Arch, Woodbury University, San Diego, CA
Jimmy has worked on a variety of projects ranging from community centers and affordable mixed-use housing to small single family additions and remodels. His experience in the deconstruction field began at Estudio Teddy Cruz. While there, he worked on a project titled “manufactured sites”, developing a “hinge” system to reconnect the various disassembled building components which travel across the U.S. border from San Diego to Tijuana. Prior to co-founding patchwork, he also worked in the offices of Rob Wellington Quigley FAIA, Jonathan Segal FAIA, and Rinehart-Herbst. In 2003, his work was published in “Designing the Highline: Ideas for reclaiming 1.5 miles of Manhattan” and in 2004 he received the AIA San Fernando Valley architectural achievement award for his exploration into “no-cost housing”. From 2007 to 2009 he served as a committee member for San Diego’s (Centre City Development Corporation) Downtown Education Task Force. Currently Jimmy is pursuing a master’s degree at Syracuse University, focusing on alternative housing and development strategies/opportunities found within existing policies and codes.
Cameron Lassiter
partner, co-founder
M.ArchII, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY
B.Arch, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR
Cameron has an interdisciplinary vision for patchwork. His wizard like vision has significantly contributed to a variety of architectural projects that range from residential to urban scales, such as the redevelopment of Boston’s Rose Kennedy Greenway while at Maryann Thompson Architects, FAIA, that innovatively reuses shipping containers and creative programming to maximize usability while also activating residual urban spaces. Cameron has also worked with a non-profit organization building shelters in Juarez, Mexico for destitute families. He is currently working on his masters at Syracuse University, with his research work addressing water rights issues and architecture’s role in community resiliency within informal settlements along the US-Mexico border.
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